World Music's DIVERSITY and Data Visualisation's EXPRESSIVE POWER collide. A galaxy of INTERACTIVE, SCORE-DRIVEN instrument model and theory tool animations is born. Entirely Graphical Toolset Supporting World Music Teaching & Learning Via Video Chat ◦ Paradigm Change ◦ Music Visualization Greenfield ◦ Crowd Funding In Ramp-Up ◦ Please Share

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Autodidact. Laird o' the Windy Wa's. Serial Failure with Attitude. Bit of a Dreamer.
Andrew Douglas Hope 2017. Powered by Blogger.
*** Not so much a blog as a user-level concept document set - randomly updated as ideas crystalize. ***

Friday, September 15, 2017

Cantillate

World Music Systems, Comparative Musicology And Ethnomusicology


The 12-tone, equal temperament music system is just one of many in use worldwide, but it’s tonal homogeneity and compatibility across octave boundaries (the ease with which a wide range of instruments can play together) and the vast and extremely accessible pool of teaching material has helped it to more or less worldwide commercial dominance.

The world's 'other' music systems -treasures in their own right- are barely acknowledged, and poorly understood.

Using data visualization techniques, could awareness of alternative, experimental and world music systems be raised?

In a post-singularity, free-time society, could we fuel a surge of interest in comparative musicology and ethnomusicology?

Some may need extended, but all the technology components lie to hand.

Big, brave, open-source, non-profit, community-provisioned, cross-cultural and crackpot crazy. → Like, share, back-link, pin, tweet and mail. Hashtags? For the crowdfunding: #VisualFutureOfMusic. For the future live platform: #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory. Or just register as a potential crowdfunder..

World Music Systems


In world music, different conventions apply: other temperaments and intonations, number of notes per octave, scales, modes and tonal (read 'cultural') spaces.

Though compatibility can on several levels be severely compromised, this is a vast and (for ‘western’ ears) often untapped field of exploration.

We lack on the one hand the cultural experience and exposure to truly appreciate the qualities of much of this music, and on the other, the comparative musicology tools to relate them back to what we do understand.

With our plans for a world music visualization aggregator platform, this is about to change.



World Music Diversity

Beyond already diverse world music instrument base configurations, musical diversity really takes off - in the form of tunings and musical scales. There are many thousands of each.

On a lute-like instrument, for example, tunings applicable to a low-order number of courses find reapplication each time a string is added to the configuration. In this sense we can immediately begin to think of hierarchy and reuse.

Complicating this is that what may be (say) a 'B' tone in one culture may have a different name, pitch and frequency in another culture. In this sense, we need to abstract down to core, measurable physical qualities.

Much the same applies to musical scales. To get an idea of the scope, we might try to gauge how many musical scales there are there in use worldwide.

Only 1% of musical terrain is represented by the 1490 scales known alone to 'western' or classical music. Yet this is the fruit of just one of perhaps hundreds of musical systems in use worldwide.

Brave souls on Quora looked at this ballpark in a little more detail, but could still only give vague guesstimates. The fact is, we simply don't know.

Indigenous Turkish, Arabic, Persian and Indian music, like many other world music systems, are microtonal in nature. While often sharing the concept of scales and modes, their intervals and note frequencies and the laws determining them are a world to themselves.

Turkey has more than 100 makams or maqams (microtonal scales) based on a system of just intonation.

The Persian Dastgah system has some overlap with Maqam (namely Rast) but otherwise on the whole the tonalities used differ.

Arabic Makams or Maqams again share the affinity with Rast, but are anchored in a 24-tone (ie microtonal) equal temperament system.

The Indian Raga is shared by both North Indian (Hindustani) and South Indian (Carnatic) music traditions, and based on an octave with 22 srutis or microintervals of musical tones or 1200 cents.

Musical Innovation

Experimental music stretches such envelopes yet further. Musical interfaces of the future will allow much greater (possibly even shape-changing) configuration flexibility, enhanced interfacing sensitivity, tonal variety and new modes of interaction, opening up a galaxy of new possibilities.

With growing experience, the tonal system on which a piece of music is based may, for dramatic effect, even be allowed to change with time.

Music is undergoing an explosion of experiment and development - entirely paralleling that of science and technology in it’s depth and reach. 

It's helpful in this context to see the various instrument configurations and underlying music systems as respectively nodes and vectors in a musical continuum.

With it’s roots in mathematics -which lends itself to algorithm- artificial intelligence and machine learning can be expected to bring both new freedoms and new challenges. In modelling it's parts, I hope we become more familiar with the whole.

Comparative Musicology And Ethnomusicology

In-browser, score-driven animations open up fascinating possibilities for musical learning, immersion, exchange - and comparison.


Notation is simply a base for tonal mappings, one notation source sometimes relevant to several tuning systems. That is to say that (for example) instruments tuned to a system other than the western equal temperament can in some cases still be played while referring to a standard western score. Concepts close to this, such as so-called transnotation, though long debated by ethnomusicologists, have yet to find their way into musician's toolsets.

Change is, however, imminent. Tonal systems -whether on an instrument model or on the basis of a theory tool (an abstraction)- can increasingly be visually compared. This draws us into the world of comparative, or 'what if?' musicology, but also ethnomusicology.



There are often many ways of visualizing these tonal differences: waveforms, relative note positions on a linear or logarithmic scale, chromatic circle or circle of 5ths, frequency scatterplots, coordinate systems, chromatic helix, and so on. The tools have to date been short of one critical component: a system to allow their automatic association with scores, and for them to be exchanged at will. The concept (and demo) exist: the idea simply needs financed.

Potential Crowdfunder?

Indeed, with many graphical theory representations available, we have the opportunity to compare theory tools, side-by-side on the screen.

Music theory is only one side of the story: we have the possibility of comparison not just in an abstract theoretical sense, but in the sense of practical impact on instrumental use.

At a simple level we may wish to compare the impact of various equal temperament guitar tunings on fingering (and hence, ultimately, tension, timbre and dynamics).

We can also answer tricky musical questions - visually. Could a just-intoned turkish bağlama or saz can be played alongside a 12-tone equal-temperament instrument, such as clarinet or african kora? Just how far apart, tonally, are the notes? What happens if we move to a higher octave?

Going further afield, how about comparison of the note namings, frequencies and intervals of the arabic ney with that of the traditional chinese Dizi (transverse flute) or it's modern counterpart, the Xindi?

This would also helpful to an established player on one instrument curious to know which other instruments (and especially timbres) would be available at little or no learning overhead. In this way, a search based on the violin's musical configuration characteristics would reveal that banjo, bouzouki and mandolin are very similar, all sharing the same layout and pitch classes, if not necessarily the same scale length or octave range.

Answers to questions like these could be approached visually in a multitude of ways.

At the End of the Day

Music and dance have held communities together over millennia, and a renaissance in the coming era of widespread unemployment may, along with other social value initiatives, offer humanity some continued sense of wellbeing.

‘Social’ music-making, however, continues to imply instrumental compatibility and a common musical language, which -who knows?- may just as easily bring us full circle as into wholly new constellations.

Whichever outcome, if the fuel on this journey is understanding, then the vehicle is a comprehensive world music aggregator platform. To date, this has not been attempted. This will now change.








Keywords



online music learning,
online music lessons
distance music learning,
distance music lessons
remote music lessons,
remote music learning
p2p music lessons,
p2p music learning
music visualisation
music visualization
musical instrument models
interactive music instrument models
music theory tools
musical theory
p2p music interworking
p2p musical interworking
comparative musicology
ethnomusicology
world music
international music
folk music
traditional music
P2P musical interworking,
Peer-to-peer musical interworking
WebGL, Web3D,
WebVR, WebAR
Virtual Reality,
Augmented or Mixed Reality
Artificial Intelligence,
Machine Learning
Scalar Vector Graphics,
SVG
3D Cascading Style Sheets,
CSS3D
X3Dom,
XML3D


Read More

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Cantillate

Music Visualization - a Roadmap to Virtuosity


Musical virtuosity: the ability to intuitively, freely and playfully navigate a genre's entire musical context (scales, their associated modes, characteristic ornaments and emotional dynamics) in a way that remains true to the expectations of a knowledgable, genre-native listener.

Given the multiple, layered challenges, it's little wonder learning an instrument is acknowledged as one of the few really effective brain training strategies.

Until now (and given enough motivation), for the enthusiast, musical virtuosity was founded years of practice, listening and rather haphazard knowledge gathering.

Central to accelerating this? The right tools, expert advice, direct access to outstanding role models, and increasingly, exploiting understanding of the brain and the core mechanisms of learning.

Yet even as artificial intelligence and machine learning take off, exploitation of the web browser's visualization capabilities -perhaps the most direct path to structured learning- has barely begun.

Without taking this initial step, of revealing world music's many treasures in graphical form, we have no way of integrating a host of other learning advances.

World music's underlying structures are global, cross-cultural and timeless. Help us get them animated, discovered, and put to use by the world's great teachers and ethnic virtuosos.

'Potential Crowd Funder' registration? Further below..

Big, brave, open-source, non-profit, community-provisioned, cross-cultural and bat cave crazy. → Like, share, back-link, pin, tweet and mail. Hashtags? For the crowdfunding: #VisualFutureOfMusic. For the future live platform: #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory. Or just register as a potential crowdfunder..


Musical Visualisation

When learning to play a musical instrument, we currently engage three learning modes:
  • ear: directly replicating pitch, dynamics and tension as heard
  • touch (tactile or gesture navigation: how we interact with instruments, their ‘user interfaces’)
  • sight: reading and interpreting music notation, but also interacting with other visual media, whether static theory diagrams, video, or incidentals such as fingering charts
The last that is of particular interest to us here. Without the integration, synchronization and animation of the full range of world music instruments and theory models, it will never realize it's full teaching and learning potential.

Musicians hear songs when they read music, non-musicians seek visual patterns.

Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text by the human brain. 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual.

How many pages of text would would be needed to convey all the information in the diagram to the left?

If this easy, why is data visualization hardly used in music teaching? Why not expose everything in animated, visual form?

In providing advanced, score-driven, interactive models for instruments and music theory, we can satisfy clear learning and teaching needs - from beginner right through to musical virtuoso.


A Galaxy of Musical Opportunity

In driving animations directly from exchange formats such as MusicXML or audio, a vast constellation of new, entirely dynamic practice and learning applications is made accessible:
  • perhaps 80% of world music instruments can soon be modeled in the browser from their generic (family) base.
  • similarly for the related theory tools.
  • complete instrument model tuning freedom, with a vast choice of automatically generated key- and fretboard roadmaps
  • where desired, algorithmically (ultimately, artificial intelligence) optimized fingering suggestions for every instrument
  • instrument models and theory tools directly linked by shared configuration parameters, so that simple 'what-if' changes to one can instantly be reflected in the other - across the entire spectrum of world music systems.

Potential Crowdfunder?

  • wider music-cultural (modal) landscapes can be explored, where, for example, a specific melody might be visualised in the context of all possible modes of it's native tonal system.
  • comparative world musicology (visual comparison of the musical characteristics -intervals, modes and other musical building blocks- of widely differing musical cultures) will lie within anyone's reach.
  • in place of the fixed fingerings of conventional scores, the opportunity to associate (map) a variety of instrument fingerings and elements of style to notation and/or instrument models.
  • every exercise or piece of music acts as driver for a slew of immersive study across multiple tools, contexts and instruments.
  • opportunities for synergies with other (non-musical) fields of study, such as mathematics, psychophysics, psychology and -in the widest sense- the visual arts.
  • structural music analysis as an aid to learning prioritization: which parts to practice most, where one can rely on repetition, where octavization is required to keep notes within the tonal boundaries of a given instrument, where 'best fit' tonal or chord alternatives can be found - and so on.
  • color, tonal/timbral and synchronization consistency across the entire spectrum of notation, instrument (finger- or keyboard) roadmap, and theory tool.
  • while recognizing that much world music is purely aural (no written notation) and/or oral (sung) by nature, a strong impetus is provided for the extension of exchange formats such as MusicXML to include music systems and cultures not currently represented.
This new transparency and modeling reach will fuel further knowledge advancement, mutual understanding and accessibility, helping to protect existing musical diversity, enhance the teacher's role, accelerate new learner progress and promote hitherto undreamed-of musical experiment.

A Roadmap to Virtuosity

There is no such thing as invention in isolation from all else going on around us. As part of the preparation for this project, we gathered a huge range of openly available, example information on instrumental and theory tool modeling. The vehicle chosen for this was Pinterest.

These are simply intended to provoke thought about what might be missing. If you spend any time at all amongst these, you will agree there is *vast* potential for social value generation.

Music Theory Esoterica Industry insights World Music Instruments DIY Dance Colour Color. #VisualFutureOfMusic #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory
A Few Of Our Pinterest
Pinboards
Dedicated to World Music Visualisation


Our goal is, in effect, to unite all the areas suggested by the above into one coherent and entirely customizable platform.

The following diagram attempts to show the way forward. Our current position is at the threshold between blue and cream areas, the medium term goal person-to-person teaching and learning worldwide.




I see this as fostering, in it's own way, both diversity and virtuosity. As shown in the diagram, however, there is another dimension: that of peer-to-peer connectivity. This is dealt with in a separate post. Can you find it? :-)


Keywords



online music learning,
online music lessons
distance music learning,
distance music lessons
remote music lessons,
remote music learning
p2p music lessons,
p2p music learning
music visualisation
music visualization
musical instrument models
interactive music instrument models
music theory tools
musical theory
p2p music interworking
p2p musical interworking
comparative musicology
ethnomusicology
world music
international music
folk music
traditional music
P2P musical interworking,
Peer-to-peer musical interworking
WebGL, Web3D,
WebVR, WebAR
Virtual Reality,
Augmented or Mixed Reality
Artificial Intelligence,
Machine Learning
Scalar Vector Graphics,
SVG
3D Cascading Style Sheets,
CSS3D
X3Dom,
XML3D


Read More

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Cantillate

A Musical Instrument Classification System As Model Web Repository


Only a tiny proportion of musical instruments have an interactive internet presence. Apart from modeling them consistently and economically in the browser, there is the challenge of their efficient and simple retrieval.

Driving instrument development are the dynamic, tonal and timbral needs of instrumentalists. Those of a folk instrumentalist can be very different from those of a classical player. Whether fast and reactive, high or low in pitch, percussive, loud, brash, mellow and smooth or with wide tonal range, each instrumentalist's demands lead to different construction forms.

Big, brave, open-source, non-profit, community-provisioned, cross-cultural and batshit crazy. → Like, share, back-link, pin, tweet and mail. Hashtags? For crowdfunding: #VisualFutureOfMusic. For the future live platform: #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory. Or just register directly as a potential crowdfunder..

Potential Crowdfunder?


Just as the simple shepherd's whistle -progressively equipped with additional holes and levers- developed towards the various forms of sophisticated modern flute, to be of lasting use, our storage mechanisms need to reflect the progressive and continuing refinement at the heart of instrument development. This implies hierarchy, reuse and intuitive extension.

Could the Hornbostel-Sachs musical instrument classification system, taken together with each instrument's purely musical configuration, provide a framework for online instrument model storage?

Of clear promise in accommodating instrumental modeling diversity across online teaching and learning environments, just how might this work?

Musical Instrument Classification

Several classification systems for musical instruments exist, chief amongst them perhaps that of Hornbostel-Sachs.

This widely-used system splits musical instruments into families based on their their tone-producing (and hence construction) characteristics, or 'form'.

Though challenged by more recent (so to say 'abstract') instrument interfaces, Hornbostel-Sachs is a good fit for conventional instruments widespread use in social or community music, dance and online, person-to-person teaching.



Chordophones (stringed instruments), for example, are split into various sub-families such as zithers, harps, lutes and their hybrids.

The 'leaves' on this instrument tree are specific instruments. Some have a unique index, while -perhaps as a result of parallel development across geographically separate cultures- others share an index.

Decoupling Form and Function

Working from a generic base, any instrument's musical function can in essence be both modelled and dynamically changed simply by modifying:


  • scale or channel lengths
  • temperament or intonation
  • number of notes per octave
  • number of channels
  • tunings
Nevertheless, not just instrument form, but also the associated function can share the same Hornbostel-Sachs index.

The index for guitar (321.322), for example, is shared with multiple other instruments, yet even a guitar can comprise a wide variety of musical configurations.

Moreover, radar charts -superimposed- open the possibility of direct visual comparison of instrument configurations:


To return to our main theme, however, the Hornbostel-Sachs hierarchy can be used both as classification system and indexing system for our instrument repository (database).

Because Hornbostel-Sachs' system omits any mention of an instrument's musical characteristics, instrument form (construction) and function (musical characteristics) remain entirely decoupled. This. Is. Good.

It also brings some striking benefits.

Web Instrument Repository

Envisaged here is a simple, global instrument model indexing and storage system ('repository'), comprising both form (structure) and function (musical characteristics). Hierarchical and hence naturally accommodating progressive refinement, it promises a quickly understood concept, storage efficiency and intuitive interfacing with cutting edge storage technologies.

This hierarchy represents not just a highly structured tree of instrument construction (form) definitions, but it's nodes are the perfect place to store details of the associated musical configurations ('function').

Because instrument model configuration is a layered and strictly sequential process, the hierarchy of "function" nodes are a wholly predictable product. Across all variants, these too form (sub) tree structures based on key-value pair nodes.

We could of course just implement each configuration set as a single, monolithic node, but this would impede visual selection (from the classification tree) of multiple instruments sharing the same characteristics.

Say I play fiddle/violin, and want to see how other 4-stringed lute family instruments would behave under the same score, in the former scenario, selecting the node representing 4 strings would immediately identify instruments such as banjo, eukele, mandolin, bass and bouzouki, possibly making them available for drag-and-drop population of my environment's menus.

In the latter scenario I would be obliged to do a database search.

Using a text-based file format such as JSON, such definitions are straightforward to create, store, access, reconstruct and manipulate.

Here (in a screenshot taken from the code editor 'Sublime Text') an example of such a JSON file applied to the classification of stringed instruments (chordophones), but with the details 'collapsed'.

JSON is widely supported by development tools, allowing the same principles to be applied to other classification hierarchies.

User-set variables such as tunings are best catalogued and mapped-to separately as user preferences.

Instrument Repository Web Access

Carefully applied, key-value pairs greatly simplify web addressing (so-called URL routing), making life easier -even if not consciously- for everyone.

They permit so-called static or semantic URLs. These are, you might say, entirely 'literal' addresses: no translation necessary.

Most front-end frameworks rely on non-semantic routing and hence require special measures to visualise both data and routes.

World music visualization aggregator platform or framework. #VisualFutureOfMusic #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory In our case, and as seen in the screenshots above, the instrument and routing hierarchy are one and the same, meaning a single visualization library provides the means for the data tree to be interrogated, browsed, added to and if necessary rearranged.

In place of some predetermined view returned by routed query, we have instrument-specific JSON configuration data returned by static URL, and used to build the instrument directly from it's parent (instrument family's) generic model.

For a multi-instrumentalist, this may in sum (and as hinted at in the illustration to the left) mean:
  • directly populating the user interface (menus etc) with own instrument preferences
  • free choice of instrument models or theory tools
  • simultaneous display and animation of several models side-by-side
  • consistent behaviours across all models
  • the ability to detach models from notation for 'what-if' experiment

These point the way towards a simple, intuitive environment fully configurable to personal preferences.

The cherry on the cake? Much has already been implemented as part of a proof of concept. I now need help on multiple levels to get this to production.

I have good people in mind, but the project needs big-time financing. Please help by registering as a potential crowd funder, and by making a buzz on social media. :-)



Keywords



online music learning,
online music lessons
distance music learning,
distance music lessons
remote music lessons,
remote music learning
p2p music lessons,
p2p music learning
music visualisation
music visualization
musical instrument models
interactive music instrument models
music theory tools
musical theory
p2p music interworking
p2p musical interworking
comparative musicology
ethnomusicology
world music
international music
folk music
traditional music
P2P musical interworking,
Peer-to-peer musical interworking
WebGL, Web3D,
WebVR, WebAR
Virtual Reality,
Augmented or Mixed Reality
Artificial Intelligence,
Machine Learning
Scalar Vector Graphics,
SVG
3D Cascading Style Sheets,
CSS3D
X3Dom,
XML3D


Read More

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Cantillate

Graphical Toolset Supported Remote Or Distance Music Learning Via Video Chat


For better or worse, music teaching is migrating to the web. "Eye contact, body language, voice, pheromones and physical contact are not available on [social media]" - Susan Greenfield in "The Internet and 'Mind-Change'".

Around the globe, musicians are struggling to find a voice - and despite a dearth of interactive teaching and learning tools, the internet is increasingly the medium of choice. Despite a dearth of supporting tools, networks of peer-to-peer learning are emerging - perhaps the most touching being the kids on YouTube teaching each other music and songs.

If on a personal level this exposes both teachers and learners to all the sensory dieback of the web, online music teaching is still essentially an emotion-driven activity. At a technical level, however, it exposes the huge potential for innovative and supportive visual toolsets.

Musicians hear songs when they read music, non-musicians seek visual patterns.

While talking visual patterns, I use diagrams a lot. Don't freak out if some of these are not (yet) so easily understood. It just means I haven't quite found the right visual metaphor. They are revised (and definitely get better) with time: the trick is to soak up the many without getting too hung up on the few.

Online And Remote (Distance Or P2P) Music Learning

We can split music learning via the internet into two distinct groups: for a very limited range of instruments, simple online learning (generally pay-for-use video and audio collections, often backed up by written and almost exclusively static documentation but, increasingly, interactive notation).

The other is 'remote' teaching, featuring a live teacher over video chat. Devoid of supporting tools, this is a challenging way to teach, but given the technical hurdles to creating an own site, by all accounts reasonably widespread.

Making contact (language, teacher directories, broadband quality) and the logistics of musical resource exchange (fingering diagrams, score collections and example recordings) are also impeding progress. If, as a learner, interested in genre-authentic stylistic and fingering guidance, these significant overheads mean there is still little real alternative to travel.

The most obvious difference between online and remote offerings lies in the teacher's ability to react to and accommodate user preferences.

Where an online learner may have had to hop between several online courses before hitting the mother lode, a live teacher can directly adapt at every level, accommodating particular instrument configurations (tunings and channel or scale lengths), the work of particular musicians, the tunes or styles the learner is particularly motivated to learn from, and of course provide direct encouragement when the going gets rough.

There is, however, more: remote teaching restores -at least in part- three critical sensory losses associated with the simpler online learning: eye contact, body language and voice. The learner senses the teacher's effortless skill, flexibility and enthusiasm, the teacher when the learner is dubious, confused or frustrated.

So what does this learning landscape look like? Let's quickly break music learners into rough groups.

This diagram gives us a clue as to the strengths potentially combined in a music visualization aggregator platform, but also the challenges.

Strengths? Accessing the instruments, skills and musical diversity 'latent' in virtuoso ethnic musicians, and the deep comparative musicology insights currently locked either in static theoretical models or in the heads of great musical thinkers.

And challenges? Bridging the gulf, for example, between written and aural traditions.

With 2- and 3D modeling in the browser sufficiently advanced to bring much of this online, the question is how, and with what reach? In a standalone aggregator platform, as a remote interworking platform with shared environment - or both?

Having made the distinction between online and remote teaching, and because learners are likely to move freely between the two, let's try to get a feeling for how easy this might be.

As we can see from the diagram, a switch between online and remote learning is possible at every point in the learning process. For all that flexibility, both learning modes suffer from the same major drawback: they can offer at best only extremely limited toolset support. This is where our aggregator platform steps in.

Adding A Graphical Toolset To The Constellation



On closer scrutiny, with instrument models, notation and theory tools available for any instrument, the problems previously challenging the casual autodidact are eliminated. Both autodidact and paying customer have access to the same online tools. The remote teacher can offer own musical and teaching skills, competing directly with video based courses. Let wealth flow. :-)

The cherry on this cake is that these tools are open source - and non-profit.

With an "Any instrument, any theory tool, any teacher or mentor, anywhere" mantra, it is set to democratize and dramatically strengthen understanding of comparative musicology, bringing remote teachers and learners together and providing entirely new meaning to immersive technical music visualization. This could, indeed, be the 'MySpace' users would have liked to have seen ... but simply never was.

Big, brave, open-source, non-profit, community-provisioned, cross-cultural and batshit crazy. → Like, share, back-link, pin, tweet and mail. Hashtags? For the crowdfunding: #VisualFutureOfMusic. For the future live platform: #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory. Or simply register as a potential crowdfunder..

World Music Online Learning

So let's see if we can round these benefits up in one big firework of a diagram.



Potential Crowdfunder?

There are of course further hurdles to overcome, but once more widely understood (and financed), I suspect this project will prove unstoppable. I hope potential contributors and users for whom the concepts have already 'clicked' can be patient.

Conventional wisdom has it that new ideas be tested directly through crowdfunding. My feeling is that this project's full value will only become widely apparent through light but ongoing education. It has, indeed, taken many blog posts just to cover the basics.

Everything achieved to date has been concerned either with concept, proof-of-concept (demos & the associated videos) or this documentation.

Though simple in concept and relatively straightforward to test, the costs of a full implementation are too much to be borne by any single person. Hence the coming crowdfunding campaign, aimed at optimization and completion of a minimum viable product (MVP). The basic mechanisms have been prototyped and demonstrated - and work.

Implemented by a small number of scalar vector graphics, web and user experience experts, this will be centred around the first of what I hope will be many interactive, score-driven open source instrument model and theory tool contributions from the musical developer community. Fully graphical, online music lessons -and especially world music learning and music visualization- are a vast greenfield area of exploration, the potential benefits to humanity huge. Let's keep this accessible and non-profit.

Avidly Seeking Sponsors #VisualFutureOfMusic #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory


If you can help with financing right now, please take a look at the current sponsorship options. Though well used to dismissing fears, with no income over a number of years now, I cheerfully admit to being in pretty desperate straights. :-)


Global Online Music Learning



World Music Distance Learning: A Galaxy Of Insights And Opportunities
World Music Aggregator Platform: Social Music And Dance #VisualFutureOfMusic #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory Irish Folk Session-The Old Dubliner Hamburg 208-0075-f-hinnerk-ruemenapf-prev
Homemade Music, Wollaita, Ethiopia (15022080727) World Music Aggregator Platform: Ceili or Ceilidh Swing. #VisualFutureOfMusic #WorldMusicInstrumentsAndTheory Sape
Swindon Mela 2008, Town Gardens, Swindon - geograph.org.uk - 897414 Girl plays the tabla Oud class at Cairo's Beit el-Oud (House of Oud)


So what are the key differentiators in the online learning space? Here we compare traditional face-to-face teaching, a typical remote learning session using video chat, Soundslice's integrated (but bitmap-hobbled) approach, and our world music visualization aggregator platform's aims.




Keywords



online music learning,
online music lessons
distance music learning,
distance music lessons
remote music lessons,
remote music learning
p2p music lessons,
p2p music learning
music visualisation
music visualization
musical instrument models
interactive music instrument models
music theory tools
musical theory
p2p music interworking
p2p musical interworking
comparative musicology
ethnomusicology
world music
international music
folk music
traditional music
P2P musical interworking,
Peer-to-peer musical interworking
WebGL, Web3D,
WebVR, WebAR
Virtual Reality,
Augmented or Mixed Reality
Artificial Intelligence,
Machine Learning
Scalar Vector Graphics,
SVG
3D Cascading Style Sheets,
CSS3D
X3Dom,
XML3D


Read More